London, England | February 2, 2015– Inmarsat (LSE:ISAT.L), the leading provider of global mobile satellite communications services, announces the successful launch of its second Global Xpress (GX) satellite (Inmarsat-5 F2) on board an International Launch Services (ILS) Proton Breeze M rocket launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan yesterday (Sunday 1 February) at 12:31 GMT.

The satellite was correctly acquired by the Inmarsat (Paumalu) ground station at ~18:10 GMT (1 February) and the Inmarsat-5 launch provider, ILS, confirmed a successful spacecraft separation at 04:02hrs GMT (2 February).

Over the coming weeks, the Inmarsat operations team will command the satellite to perform a series of manoeuvres to raise Inmarsat-5 F2 to a geo-synchronous elliptical orbit, while towards the end of the month, the satellite will have completed deployment of its solar arrays and reflectors. This will be followed by the electrical orbit-raising phase, taking the spacecraft to its final geostationary orbit. This is scheduled to be completed by the end of March, ready for the start of payload testing at the beginning of April.

Built by Boeing Satellite Systems International Inc. (“Boeing”) to a proven design (702HP), Inmarsat-5 F2 is part of a US$1.6 billion investment by Inmarsat into the next generation of global mobile broadband communications.

Inmarsat is the owner and commercial operator of the Global Xpress constellation. The fleet of high throughput satellites will offer a unique combination of seamless global Ka-band coverage from a single operator, consistent higher performance, and the network reliability for which Inmarsat is renowned.

Rupert Pearce, CEO of Inmarsat, said: “The successful launch of our second Inmarsat-5 satellite by Proton is a significant step forward on our journey to deliver the world’s first globally available, high speed mobile broadband service. Our first GX satellite entered commercial service in July 2014 and has since been delivering an excellent service to our customers in Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia. With Inmarsat-5 F3 expected for launch by Proton in the coming months, we are on schedule to achieve full global coverage early in the second half of 2015.

“This is a great achievement and I would like to pay tribute to the skill and expertise of Inmarsat’s engineering teams and all our employees involved in the design, development, manufacturing, testing and launch. It is their dedication, alongside the outstanding support we have received from our manufacturing and launch partners – Boeing and ILS – which has helped deliver such a successful outcome.”

Luxembourg | October 16, 2014– Intelsat S.A. (NYSE: I), the world’s leading provider of satellite services, today announced that an Ariane 5 vehicle successfully launched the Intelsat 30 satellite, which is hosting the DLA-1 payload for DIRECTV Latin America from French Guiana. Liftoff occurred at 5:43 p.m EDT. The Intelsat 30 satellite, hosting the DLA-1 payload, separated from the rocket’s upper stage 28 minutes after launch, at 6:12 p.m EDT, and signal acquisition has been confirmed.

Built for Intelsat by Space Systems/Loral (SSL), Intelsat 30 is a 20-kilowatt class Ku- and C-band satellite. The Ku-band payload, known as DLA-1, is designed to provide distribution services for DIRECTV Latin America in South America and the Caribbean.

The C-band portion enhances Intelsat’s existing C-band service infrastructure serving Latin America. The satellite will be co-located with Intelsat’s Galaxy 3C satellite at 95°W and is expected to have a service life of more than 15 years.

“The Intelsat 30 satellite, and its DLA1 payload, demonstrates the close collaboration and continuing strong relationship between DIRECTV Latin America and Intelsat,” said Intelsat Chairman & CEO Dave McGlade. “We look forward to helping DIRECTV Latin America deliver reliable, high quality entertainment to their subscribers throughout the region.”

Intelsat 30 marks the first of two new hybrid C- and Ku-band satellites, for which the Ku-band payload will provide services to DIRECTV Latin America. The second satellite, Intelsat 31, is scheduled for launch in the second half of 2015.

December 9, 2013– Inmarsat (LSE:ISAT.L), the leading provider of global mobile satellite communications services, announces the successful launch of first Inmarsat-5 Global Xpress®satellite. It was launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on 8 December on a Proton Breeze M rocket. The launch is a major milestone in the development of GX Aviation, which will provide the world’s airlines and aircraft operators with the first global high speed mobile broadband service.

Inmarsat is the owner and commercial operator of the Global Xpress constellation. By the close of 2014, the fleet will comprise three high throughput satellites and GX Aviation will offer a unique combination of seamless global Ka-band coverage from a single operator, consistent performance of up to 50Mbps, and the network reliability for which Inmarsat is renowned. In addition to passenger communications, it will support real-time TV and live feeds from the internet, for example, and will offer airlines future-proofed connectivity with ample broadband capacity for growth.

Miranda Mills, Inmarsat President, Aviation said: “We are getting closer and closer to the introduction of GX Aviation. It will revolutionize inflight connectivity for both passengers and crew. The successful launch of this satellite means that we are well on track to providing the world’s first globally available, high speed mobile broadband service in 2015.”

The I-5 satellites are built by Boeing Satellite Systems International Inc., based on the proven 702HP design. Inmarsat-5 F1 is part of a US$1.6 billion investment by Inmarsat into the next generation of global mobile broadband communications.

The satellite was correctly acquired by the Inmarsat Paumalu station at 17:48 GMT on December 8. Over the coming two weeks, the Inmarsat controllers will command the satellite to perform seven chemical burns to raise it to its geo-synchronous elliptical orbit. By the end of December, the satellite will have completed deployment of its solar arrays and reflectors. This will be followed by the electrical orbit-raising phase, taking the spacecraft to its final geostationary orbit. This is scheduled to be completed by the end of January, ready for the start of payload testing at the beginning of February.

The satellite weighed over six metric tons at lift-off and has 89 Ka-band beams. It is designed to generate approximately 15 kilowatts of power at the start of service and, to generate such high power, the spacecraft’s two solar wings – with a similar span to a Boeing 737 – each employ five panels of ultra-triple-junction solar cells.