April 29, 2019– We want to provide a response to several news stories yesterday and today reporting on the disagree alert on the 737 MAX.

Boeing included the disagree alert as a standard feature on the MAX, although this alert has not been considered a safety feature on airplanes and is not necessary for the safe operation of the airplane. Boeing did not intentionally or otherwise deactivate the disagree alert on its MAX airplanes.

The disagree alert was intended to be a standard, stand-alone feature on MAX airplanes. However, the disagree alert was not operable on all airplanes because the feature was not activated as intended.

The disagree alert was tied or linked into the angle of attack indicator, which is an optional feature on the MAX. Unless an airline opted for the angle of attack indicator, the disagree alert was not operable.

On every airplane delivered to our customers, including the MAX, all flight data and information needed to safely operate the aircraft is provided in the flight deck and on the flight deck display. This information is readily accessible to pilots, and it always has been.

The air speed, attitude, and altitude displays, together with the stick shaker, are the primary flight information indicators in the flight deck. All recommended pilot actions, checklists, and training are based upon these primary indicators, not on the AOA disagree alert or the angle of attack indicator.

As the MAX safely returns to the air after the software modifications are approved and certified, all MAX production aircraft will have an activated and operable disagree alert and an optional angle of attack indicator. All customers with previously delivered MAX airplanes will have the ability to activate the disagree alert per a service bulletin to airlines.

We are confident that when the MAX returns to the skies, it will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly.

Chicago, USA | April 5, 2019– As we work closely with customers and global regulators to return the 737 MAX to service, we continue to be driven by our enduring values, with a focus on safety, integrity and quality in all we do.

We now know that the recent Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 accidents were caused by a chain of events, with a common chain link being erroneous activation of the aircraft’s MCAS function. We have the responsibility to eliminate this risk, and we know how to do it. As part of this effort, we’re making progress on the 737 MAX software update that will prevent accidents like these from ever happening again. Teams are working tirelessly, advancing and testing the software, conducting non-advocate reviews, and engaging regulators and customers worldwide as we proceed to final certification. I recently had the opportunity to experience the software update performing safely in action during a 737 MAX 7 demo flight.  We’re also finalizing new pilot training courses and supplementary educational material for our global MAX customers. This progress is the result of our comprehensive, disciplined approach and taking the time necessary to get it right.

As we continue to work through these steps, we’re adjusting the 737 production system temporarily to accommodate the pause in MAX deliveries, allowing us to prioritize additional resources to focus on software certification and returning the MAX to flight. We have decided to temporarily move from a production rate of 52 airplanes per month to 42 airplanes per month starting in mid-April.

At a production rate of 42 airplanes per month, the 737 program and related production teams will maintain their current employment levels while we continue to invest in the broader health and quality of our production system and supply chain.

We are coordinating closely with our customers as we work through plans to mitigate the impact of this adjustment. We will also work directly with our suppliers on their production plans to minimize operational disruption and financial impact of the production rate change.

In light of our commitment to continuous improvement and our determination to always make a safe industry even safer, I’ve asked the Boeing Board of Directors to establish a committee to review our company-wide policies and processes for the design and development of the airplanes we build.  The committee will confirm the effectiveness of our policies and processes for assuring the highest level of safety on the 737-MAX program, as well as our other airplane programs, and recommend improvements to our policies and procedures.

The committee members will be Adm. Edmund P. Giambastiani, Jr., (Ret.), former vice chairman, U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, who will serve as the committee’s chair; Robert A. Bradway, chairman and CEO of Amgen, Inc.; Lynn J. Good, chairman, president and CEO of the Duke Energy Corporation; and Edward M. Liddy, former chairman and CEO of the Allstate Corporation, all members of the company’s board. These individuals have been selected to serve on this committee because of their collective and extensive experiences that include leadership roles in corporate, regulated industries and government entities where safety and the safety of lives is paramount.

Safety is our responsibility, and we own it. When the MAX returns to the skies, we’ve promised our airline customers and their passengers and crews that it will be as safe as any airplane ever to fly. Our continued disciplined approach is the right decision for our employees, customers, supplier partners and other stakeholders as we work with global regulators and customers to return the 737 MAX fleet to service and deliver on our commitments to all of our stakeholders.

Chicago, USA | April 4, 2019– Boeing issued the following statement regarding the release today of the preliminary investigation report of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 by the Ethiopian Accident Investigation Bureau (AIB).

“I’d like to reiterate our deepest sympathies are with the families and loved ones of those who lost their lives in the accident,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Kevin McAllister. “We thank Ethiopia’s Accident Investigation Bureau for its hard work and continuing efforts. Understanding the circumstances that contributed to this accident is critical to ensuring safe flight. We will carefully review the AIB’s preliminary report, and will take any and all additional steps necessary to enhance the safety of our aircraft.”

Safety is a core value for everyone at Boeing and the safety of our airplanes, our customers’ passengers and crews is always our top priority. Boeing’s technical experts continue to assist in this investigation and company-wide teams are working to address lessons from the Lion Air Flight 610 accident in October.

The preliminary report contains flight data recorder information indicating the airplane had an erroneous angle of attack sensor input that activated the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) function during the flight, as it had during the Lion Air 610 flight.

To ensure unintended MCAS activation will not occur again, Boeing has developed and is planning to release a software update to MCAS and an associated comprehensive pilot training and supplementary education program for the 737 MAX.

As previously announced, the update adds additional layers of protection and will prevent erroneous data from causing MCAS activation. Flight crews will always have the ability to override MCAS and manually control the airplane.

Boeing continues to work with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and other regulatory agencies worldwide on the development and certification of the software update and training program.

Boeing also is continuing to work closely with the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) as technical advisors in support of the AIB investigation. As a party providing technical assistance under the direction of investigating authorities, Boeing is prevented by international protocol and NTSB regulations from disclosing any information relating to the investigation. In accordance with international protocol, information about the investigation is provided only by investigating authorities in charge.

BBJ MAX offers customers unmatched range and comfort
Boeing unveils new BBJ MAX interior design concept

Orlando, USA | October 15, 2018–Boeing Business Jets (BBJ) has delivered the first BBJ MAX airplane to a customer, the company announced today at the National Business Aviation Conference and Exhibition (NBAA-BACE).  The aircraft is scheduled to fly to an interior finishing center.

“We are excited to begin delivering a longer-range and more capable version of the world’s most popular business jetliner,” said Greg Laxton, head of Boeing Business Jets. “There has been great market interest and anticipation for the BBJ MAX and our valued customers will soon be able to see the new standard in business travel.”

Customers from around the world have placed orders for 20 BBJ MAX airplanes. Most recently, Seacons Trading Ltd announced in July it is purchasing a BBJ MAX 7 at the 2018 Farnborough International Airshow.

To commemorate the first delivery, Boeing Business Jets unveiled a new interior concept by award winning aviation design firm SkyStyle. The concept, named Genesis by SkyStyle Co-Founders Max Pardo and Lucas Colombo, represents the company’s debut in BBJ MAX design.

“From an aviation designer’s perspective, the BBJ MAX is incredibly appealing because there is so much more interior space to realize one’s vision,” said Max Pardo. “And since the MAX flies ultra-long-distances, the owners are looking for a comfortable lounge, multi-function conference area and a large master suite to ensure the ultimate flight experience.”

The BBJ MAX Genesis concept draws inspiration from nature’s tranquility, its voluminous clouds hanging over a white sand beach, smooth rolling hills and a starry night sky.

“BBJ MAX interiors have always been a sharp departure from the cramped cabins of smaller business jets, and the Genesis design is yet another example of our exclusive cabin capabilities,” said Laxton.

The BBJ MAX family – based on Boeing’s best-selling 737 MAX airplane – offers business jet customers the best combination of space, comfort and range.  With more than three times the cabin area as most competing business jets, bespoke interiors to match any preference, and lower cabin altitude, the jet is capable of flying 7,000 nautical miles (12,964 km).

In addition, BBJ MAX owners benefit from a lower total cost to own when compared to other high-end business jets. The MAX’s optimized maintenance schedule drives operating costs that are nearly the same as smaller, less comfortable competitors. BBJs also retain comparatively higher residual values by requiring a fraction of the lengthy and expensive shop visits experienced by other business jets as they age. As a result, the BBJ MAX can save customers millions of dollars in total ownership expenditure over the life of the airplane.