• Largest single 737 MAX order from a leasing company
  • World’s third-largest leasing company grows fleet of high-demand, fuel-efficient airplanes

Tokyo, Japan | November 10, 2014– Boeing (NYSE: BA) and SMBC Aviation Capital announced an order for 80 737 MAX 8s, valued at more than $8.5 billion at list prices. This is the largest single order for 737 MAXs from a leasing company and will help SMBC Aviation Capital grow its portfolio of high-demand, fuel-efficient airplanes.

With this agreement SMBC Aviation Capital becomes the 50th 737 MAX customer and grows the program’s order book to more than 2,400 airplanes.

“It is 10 years since our business placed its first order with Boeing and we have enjoyed a decade of successful partnership since then,” said Peter Barrett, CEO, SMBC Aviation Capital. “The 737 MAX 8 is one of the most fuel efficient and versatile aircraft available and today’s announcement shows our ongoing commitment to the new generation of the popular 737 family, as well as our appetite to keep broadening and deepening our platform in order to service our customers’ requirements. Following this order and given the clear commitment of our shareholders and the strength of the global aircraft leasing sector, we remain very confident in our ability to continue to deliver long-term growth.”

SMBC Aviation Capital and Boeing celebrated the announcement earlier today at a signing ceremony in Tokyo.

“This order is another example of our history of partnership with SMBC Aviation Capital and Japan,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and CEO Ray Conner. “Today’s announcement from a top leasing company is a vote of confidence in our 737 MAX and helps SMBC Aviation Capital capture the strong demand in the single-aisle market.”

Boeing’s Current Market Outlook forecasts that airlines will need more than 25,600 single-aisle airplanes like the 737 MAX over the next 20 years.

The 737 MAX incorporates the latest technology CFM International LEAP-1B engines, Advanced Technology winglets and other improvements to deliver the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market. The 737 MAX will be 14 percent more fuel-efficient than today’s most efficient Next-Generation 737s – and 20 percent better than the original Next-Generation 737s when they first entered service.

Boeing has been doing business in Japan for more than 60 years, during which time it has built close and enduring partnerships with Japanese customers and industry partners. Japanese customers have purchased over 1,000 Boeing airplanes and Japan’s aerospace companies make a significant contribution to all Boeing commercial airplane programs: the 737, 747-8, 777 and 787, and now the 737 MAX and 777X.

SMBC Aviation Capital has 180 Boeing airplanes in its portfolio and has 95 airline customers in more than 40 countries.

  • Middle East operators expected to require 2,610 new airplanes over next 20 years
  • Traffic growth in the Middle East continues to outpace the rest of the world

Dubai, UAE | November 14, 2013/PRNewswire/–

Boeing (NYSE: BA) forecasts that airlines in the Middle East will require 2,610 new airplanes over the next 20 years, worth an estimated $550 billion. While one-third of that demand – 900 airplanes – will replace today’s fleets, 66 percent of the demand is expected to be driven by the rapid fleet expansion in the region.

According to the Boeing Current Market Outlook (CMO), long-range, twin-aisle airplanes – such as the Boeing 777 and 787 Dreamliner – will continue to dominate the Middle East’s order books, reflecting the global network priorities and emerging alliances and partnerships of the region’s carriers.

“International traffic growth in the Middle East continues to outpace the rest of the world,” said Randy Tinseth, Vice President of Marketing, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “The Gulf region benefits from a unique geographic position that enables one-stop connectivity between Europe, Africa, Asia and Australasia. Additionally, over the last decade, we’ve seen a rise in low-cost carriers that have benefitted from a large youthful population, large migrant workforce and trends toward market liberalization.”

According to the Boeing forecast, twin-aisle aircraft will account for more than half of the region’s new airplane deliveries over the 20-year period – as compared to 24 percent globally. Single-aisle airplanes, such as the Boeing 737, will make up 47 percent of regional deliveries through to 2032, while large airplanes such as the Boeing 747 will account for 10 percent of forecasted demand. Regional jets account for the remaining 1 percent of the demand.

“Boeing is well-positioned to address demand in the Middle East,” Tinseth said. “Boeing airplanes provide airlines in the region with the capability to serve their expanding networks, the comfort and flexibility for a premium brand experience and the superior operating economics to create advantages not only for the airlines, but the flying public as well.”

Globally, Boeing has forecast a long-term demand for 35,280 new airplanes, valued at $4.8 trillion. These new airplanes will replace older, less efficient airplanes, benefiting airlines and passengers and stimulating growth in emerging markets and innovation in airline business models. To meet the growing demand for new airplanes, Boeing has increased production of its popular 737, 777 and 787 airplane families.

For more information on Boeing’s Current Market Outlook please visit: http://www.boeing.com/cmo

 

– Region leads global need for commercial airline pilots, technicians

Singapore | August 27, 2012/PRNewswire/– Boeing (NYSE: BA) predicts the Asia Pacific region will require hundreds of thousands of new commercial airline pilots and maintenance technicians over the next 20 years to support airline fleet modernization and the rapid growth of air travel.

The 2012 Boeing Pilot & Technician Outlook, a respected industry forecast of required aviation personnel, calls for 185,600 new pilots and 243,500 new technicians in the Asia Pacific region through 2030. China will have the largest demand in the region, needing 71,300 pilots and 99,400 technicians over the next 20 years.

“This great need for aviation personnel is a global issue, but it’s hitting the Asia Pacific region particularly hard,” said Bob Bellitto, global sales director, Boeing Flight Services. “Some airlines are already experiencing delays and operational interruptions because they don’t have enough qualified pilots. Surging economies in the region are driving travel demand. Airlines and training providers need new and more engaging ways to fill the pipeline of pilots and technicians for the future.”

Boeing is working globally to meet this anticipated demand. In June, the company signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Indonesian Ministry of Transportation to jointly work to establish aviation training programs. Boeing is also expanding partnerships around the world to develop a global flight school network to better supply capable and well-qualified aviation personnel.

The Boeing outlook projects that North East Asia will need 18,800 pilots and 26,500 technicians over the next 20 years. South East Asia will require 51,500 pilots and 67,400 technicians. The Oceania region will need 12,900 pilots and 17,100 technicians and South West Asia will need 31,000 pilots and 33,100 technicians.

“As an industry, we have to get the next generation excited about working in the field of aviation,” Bellitto said. “We are competing for talent with alluring hi-tech, software and mobile companies and start-ups. We’re working hard to showcase our industry as a truly global, technological, multi-faceted environment where individuals from all backgrounds and disciplines can make a significant impact.”

The Asia Pacific region also leads the demand for new commercial airplane deliveries over the next 20 years, with 12,030 new airplanes needed by 2031 according to Boeing’s 2012 Current Market Outlook.

More information on the 2012 Pilot & Technician Outlook is available at http://www.boeing.com/commercial/cmo/pilot_technician_outlook.html

Demand For 2,520 New Airplanes Over The Next 20 Years

Dubai, UAE | November 14, 2011 — Boeing (NYSE: BA) forecasts that airlines in the Middle East will need an estimated 2,520 airplanes worth $450 billion by 2030. The forecast comes as the region’s carriers continue to surpass global air traffic and capacity growth rates.

Boeing estimates that the Middle East’s fleet of passenger airplanes will grow from a current fleet of 1,040 airplanes to a projected 2,710 airplanes, an increase of 160 percent. 34 percent of the projected demand will be for airplanes to replace current aircraft, while 66 percent will be part of fleet expansion plans as the region’s airlines gear up for significant growth over the next two decades.

“The Middle East has seen an unprecedented growth in capacity over the past 10 years and every indication points to a further, significantly large increase over the next 20 years,” said Boeing Commercial Airplanes Vice President of Marketing Randy Tinseth, who presented Boeing’s Current Market Outlook at the 2011 Dubai Air Show. “The region’s airlines with their forward thinking approach have become a competitive force globally.”

Single- and twin-aisle airplanes will account for 90 percent of the Middle East’s new airplane deliveries over the 20-year period, according to the Boeing forecast. An estimated 1,160 single-aisle jets, such as the Boeing 737 MAX, and 1,110 twin-aisle airplanes, such as the Boeing 777 and 787 Dreamliner, are expected to be delivered to the region during this time. The remaining ten percent is split between large airplanes such as the Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental and will account for 7 percent of projected demand, with an estimated 180 airplanes to be delivered to airlines in the Middle East. Regional jets will account for the remaining 3 percent.

“The collective capacity of three airlines, Emirates Airline, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways has grown by an average of 23 percent annually over the past decade and we expect this trend to continue well into the future. All three airlines base their growth strategies on the principle that newer, more efficient airplanes will provide a competitive advantage over their rivals from Europe and Asia,” Tinseth said. “This visionary approach of investing in the future has allowed the region’s airlines to stay ahead of the competition.”

“With a range of airplanes that fulfill the region’s requirement for capacity expansion and improved operating efficiencies, Boeing is well positioned to meet the region’s needs,” he added.

As of September 14, 2011, Boeing had a backlog of 300 airplanes in the Middle East. Customers in the region count for a large share of Boeing’s twin-aisle backlog, accounting for 26 percent of 777s and 15 percent of 787s on order. Boeing currently has a total of 47 customers in the region that operate an estimated 1,200 flights per day on 425 Boeing airplanes.

The full Boeing Current Market Outlook report can be found at www.boeing.com/cmo.